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EASTERN BARRED BANDICOOTS FIND A HOME AT WOODLEIGH

On Wednesday 27 July, the first three of a planned eight critically endangered Eastern Barred Bandicoots found new homes in Woodleigh School’s unique Wildlife Reserve, sharing with a mob of swamp wallabies and our two resident emus. The bandicoots, now considered extinct on the Australian mainland, have been part of a Zoos Victoria breeding program which hopes to reintroduce bandicoot populations into the wild in the coming years.

Woodleigh’s role is to house and monitor post-reproductive animals, freeing up space in the Zoo’s captive breeding pens for younger reproductive pairs to continue to produce new young.

Year 12 student Romy Lipszyc said, “Being able to take in, care for and monitor such a critically endangered species is an amazing opportunity for students and cements Woodleigh’s core value of Respect for the Environment.” The release of the bandicoots has been eight years in the making and is a significant milestone in the School’s partnership with Zoos Victoria.

"Being able to take in, care for and monitor such a critically endangered species is an amazing opportunity for students and cements Woodleigh’s core value of Respect for the Environment."

We won’t be short on interested students to help care for the Reserve’s newest inhabitants either! Four senior students have been accepted to attend the National Youth Science Forum in Canberra next January, joining students from across the Asia Pacific Region for two weeks of intensive Science education and networking opportunities with other students, researchers, scientists and professors from across Australia and abroad.

We look forward to having these four, and many other students, continue to involve themselves in the wide variety of Science programs at Woodleigh School; from aviation and flight, through to animal husbandry and conservation, and everything in between.